Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo

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Habitat: Woodland, Coastal

Habitat

The Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo inhabits native woodlands dominated by eucalypts such as wandoo and salmon gum, as well as nearby heathlands. They need large hollows in tall eucalypts for breeding. From late winter till summer, they usually occur in these habitats in inland parts of their range. In late summer, they move to coastal and near-coastal areas, where they sometimes occur in built-up areas.

Behaviour

Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo is often rather conspicuous, sometimes congregating in large flocks. They are even considered pests by some farmers when they descend onto crops of almonds and similar foods. Cockatoos may move along a branch, biting off cones or seeds and green branches for no clear reason.

Feeding

The Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo eats mainly seeds of plants from the Proteaceae family, introduced pines and sometimes nectar, flowers and insect larvae. They feed in trees. They cut off seeds and cones with their strong bills and then hold the food with one foot while they strip the seeds. They sometimes forage in pine trees and orchards. Occasionally, they forage on the ground, especially in areas with the agricultural weed Erodium.

Breeding

Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos breed in monogamous pairs, and nest in hollows in old eucalypts, which must be at least 100 years old to have hollows large enough. Pairs return to the same nest site each year. They lay one or two white eggs, which are incubated by the female for 28 days. The nestling period is 70 days, and both parents feed the chicks, but only the female broods them. She is fed by the male, though she may leave to get water. Their breeding season is from late July to October.